The History Of Pedestrian Crossing Signs

pedestrian crossing sign

They’re something that’s ubiquitous today, but if you think about it, pedestrian crossing signs haven’t always been with us, nor have they always existed in their current form. We owe them a lot in the modern day (just ask any car accident injuries lawyer in Denver how dangerous the roads might be without them), so let’s take a look back at how these important informational markers came to be, and how they have evolved over the years.

How Pedestrian Signs Came To Be

A world without any kind of crossing signs? That’s the one humans inhabited until 1868, when English inventor John Peake Knight came up with an idea that would revolutionize society. 

His idea? A signaling system to help cut down on the number of individuals struck and killed by horse-drawn carriage traffic. Installed near Westminster Bridge, that first sign was manually-powered, and could caution the roadway traffic of the time that individuals were crossing on foot (and that they’d need to slow down). Though this original design is a fair bit different than what we’re used to today, there were some similarities. In particular, the original street crossing signal used colored lights to make themselves more visible at night — the colors were green and red.

This foray into crossing signs was successful in controlling traffic and safeguarding pedestrians, but it was short lived. Unfortunately, a leak in one of the gas lines that supplied lighting to the sign exploded, injuring the manual operator. The need to protect pedestrians was still around, though, so in both Europe and the Americas, the evolution of signage continued.

Many of those early models were manually powered, but advances in technology after the turn of the 20th Century allowed for some interesting innovation to come in the form of electrically-powered models as early as 1912. That first electric model came about in Salt Lake City, Utah, with other iterations and evolutions following suit from inventors around the country, much more closely resembling what we think of when looking at pedestrian and traffic signs today.

Evolution Of The Crossing Sign

Traffic and pedestrian signs continued to become more and more advanced throughout the 20th Century. Iteration and technological improvements made them integrated, then automated with timers, then, eventually, computerized to better account for the ebbs and flows of traffic. 

These have often been paired with lighting to inform motorists when pedestrians are coming, and to alert pedestrians when it’s safe to cross and when they need to halt. Thanks to this ever advancing technology, our roadways have been able to stay just that much safer for those on foot.

How To Run A Successful Trucking Business

fleet of trucks

A trucking business can be a lucrative venture, but it’s one that you’ll have to plan for properly. In order to be successful, you’ll need to do a lot of legwork nailing down the right market and breaking into it effectively. If you’re not successful (which is a real possibility), you’ll also need a plan for bailing out in a manner that minimizes the risks to you. Here are a few tips to point you in the right direction.

Start With A Business Plan

Like most businesses, having a plan from the onset will help your future trucking company maximize its chances of success. The business plan is where you’ll lay out the important details that will help you march toward your goals. You can use your business plan to identify the specific niche you want to target, for instance. When you’re just breaking into the industry, you’ll need to specialize your services to make the most headway, and avoid competing with larger entities right off the bat.

Use your business plan to perform that critical market analysis, identifying the needs of the customers in said market, how you can price your services to stay competitive, what your targets are for capturing market share, etc. You can also use your business plan to lay out a sales and marketing strategy, and to formalize details like the name of your business, company structure, and the like.

Have Some Experience

You won’t want to go in raw, so you need to have some experience before venturing off on your own. Most recommend spending some time as a company driver or a dispatcher so that you can gain some valuable insight on the inner workings of the business before you make your foray into running a company for yourself. This understanding, coupled with that solid business plan, should give you a great start once it comes time for you to get your business rolling.

Have An Exit Strategy

Of course, there’s always a possibility that things won’t go your way, even with the best laid plan. That’s why it’s important to also have a plan for bowing out with dignity. It might help to consult a business litigation attorney to discuss dissolution before you even hit the ground with your business, just so you know the steps you’ll have to take should you have to call it quits. Even if you don’t, keeping an expert’s contact info around is smart planning and will help you prepare for every possibility.

Car accident costs if you don’t have insurance

car insurance mechanic estimating damage costs

It’s common for people to think they can go without insurance, especially if they’re rarely sick or need medical care. As all too many find out, however, this can easily become a costly mistake. While there are plenty of ways to land yourself in the emergency room, auto accidents remain one of the most expensive. Here’s how much you might have to pay without insurance. 

The Ambulance

Depending on the severity of the accident, you might have to rely on EMTs and an ambulance to transport you to the hospital. The cost of an ambulance ride varies from one location to the next, but you can expect to pay between $224 and $2,204 for a single trip. 

A Hospital Stay

The average hospital stay without insurance costs, (are you ready?) $10,000. If you’re over 45, that price jumps to $12,500. Those aged 18 to 44 will pay less on average, but most people don’t have thousands of dollars lying around to spend on in-hospital care. 

Urgent Care Clinics

Let’s say your accident wasn’t quite so severe. You could always head to an urgent care clinic for treatment to save money, but how much can you save without insurance? As it turns out, a lot. The cost would range between $71 and $125. Keep in mind, however, anything too serious for a clinic to treat means you’re headed to the hospital anyway. 

CT Scans, MRIs, and X-Rays

Various injuries require scans to detail the amount of damage done. Bone, blood vessel, and tissue damage requires a series of CT or CAT scans. Those will run you anywhere between $270 and $4,800 based on what part of your body needs scanned. 

As for MRIs, you can expect to pay in-between $400 and $3,500 depending on where you need monitored. X-Rays can run you somewhere between $260 and $460 based on location. Don’t forget that X-rays usually mean broken bones, which cost $2,500 for non-surgical treatments. 

Physical Therapy

If your injuries are severe enough, you might need to undergo physical therapy. Each session can range from $50 to $350, but keep in mind that you will need multiple sessions in order to recover. In a hospital setting, as opposed to a clinic, you’re going to pay a much higher price. 

Concussions

Head injuries are common in auto accidents, with many leading to concussions. Treating this condition isn’t cheap, with the average price tag hanging around $18,454. That price can increase in combination with other treatments. 

Why Insurance Matters

If you tally up these totals, the medical costs of your accident would be between $32,479 and $48,743. That’s as much as a brand-new car and far more than most people have sitting in the bank. Of course, your costs will vary based on the injuries you receive. These figures also exclude surgery, so take that into consideration as well. 

With health insurance, the majority of these expenses are covered. You might still have a copay, but even that is capped at a low amount. While you might not think you need health insurance, you’ll wish you had it if you ever find yourself in an accident. 

Cool facts about Harley-Davidson

harley davidson motorcycle

Think you know everything there is to know about Harley-Davidson? So do a lot of diehard riders, but there are more ins and outs to this highly coveted manufacturer than most people realize. See if you know these cool facts about Harley. 

Harley-Davidson Survived the Great Depression

In 1929, businesses and individuals alike were rocked by an incredibly challenging depression. Most people found themselves out of work as companies closed their doors permanently. That includes motorcycle companies, whose buyers considered bikes a luxury item. 

Despite a dismal economic world, Harley-Davidson and Indian Motorcycle Company alone managed to survive. Harley was able to do so by continuing to create industrial engines, no matter how little revenue they provided, just to keep themselves from going under. 

The First Harley Was Built in a Shed

Most enormous companies started out with the humblest of beginnings, and the same is true for Harley. The first motorcycle they every created was crafted in a ten by fifteen-foot shed with “Harley-Davidson” etched into the door. 

The original model features an incredibly small motor, and its body was little more than a bicycle. It was never released to the public, but their first fully functioning prototype would be released in 1903. By 1905, a few alterations would help get the business off the ground with sales. Imagine the legal complications of explaining the safety specs of this bike to a motorcycle accident attorney in Orange County

Harley is Global

While Harley-Davidson is an all-American brand, they do sell their motorcycles around the world. They have four locations in the U.S. and manufacturing plants in Brazil, Thailand, and India. There’s also a metallurgy plant in Australia. Of course, anyone in any country can buy their bikes. 

100 Years of Police Bikes

When Harley-Davidson took off, it wasn’t long before police departments took notice and started making requests. By 1907, Harley was officially pumping out motorcycles for law enforcement agencies. Since bikes were more reliable, maneuverable, and faster than cars of the time, it only made sense.

A sole survivor of this time period once belonged to the Los Angeles Police Department, recently popping in at an auction fully restores in its original glory. Harley-Davidson still creates police choppers to this day. 

Service in World War I

Motorcycles in the battlefield were quickly becoming the norm as World War I raged on. The British implemented the Triumph Model H, which was quickly overshadowed when America unveiled the Harley-Davidson in 1917. 

Thousands of these bikes were sent to allied troops, while the U.S. implemented 15,000 for their soldiers. Going from an inventory of five to 15,000 in just under two decades solidified Harley’s place in the American and global market. Heading into World War II, the company would receive two Army-Navy E awards for their aid. 

The Term HOG

Harleys are affectionately called hogs today for their beastly appearance and sound, despite once marketing their motorcycles as the quietest. The term comes from a group of farmers in the 1920s who raced Harleys. After a victory, they would parade their mascot pig around on the bikes.

Harley caught wind of this and embraced the term immediately. They even created the acronym H.O.G. for Harley Owners Group. While they couldn’t trademark the term, they did manage to change their NYSE title from HDI to HOG in 2016. 

Pros And Cons Of Freelancing

Freelance work is here to stay. Technological advances have made freelance opportunities more prevalent than ever before, and according to recent statistics on freelance work, there are an estimated 53 million people doing freelance work in the United States, roughly 34% of the national workforce.

There are a lot of perks that make freelancing desirable to engage in, but it’s not all sunshine and roses. There are advantages and disadvantages alike to freelancing, and today, we’re going to lay some of the most common ones out on the table so you know exactly what they are before you dive head first into the freelance world.

Pro: More Freedom In How You Work

Perhaps the clearest benefit to freelancing is the freedom to pick your schedule and work where and when you choose. By and large, freelancers are independent contractors, so the companies contracting them for services don’t get to dictate the means and methods of said services. If you’re looking to set your own hours and have generous amounts of latitude working from a home office, freelancing has this upside in spades.

Con: Fewer Benefits And Protections

As a freelancer, employer-provided benefits like vacation pay, sick leave, and the like are non-existent, and you’ll need to develop your own backup plan to ensure you’re covered during those hard times. As Los Angeles compensation lawyer Omid Nostrati points out, it is important to know when the work you’re doing has been misclassified as independent contracting, as this is sometimes a way employers try to skirt around properly paying and providing benefits to employees.

Pro: Easier Barrier To Entry And Higher Compensation

This isn’t a hard rule, but oftentimes, because freelancers require less of a commitment on the part of a company, it might be a bit easier to get yourself contracted for the odd job here or there when compared to scoring a full-time position. What’s more, the reduced overhead of working with freelancers means they might also be able to offer an increased rate of compensation for those services.

Con: Sporadic Cash Flow

There’s less security in freelance work, and nearly all freelancers have run into those lean times where jobs just aren’t coming in and all the usual clients just don’t have a need for your services. This means cash can get tight, and if you haven’t planned ahead for the lean times, it can be difficult to make your way.

Pro: It’s Fresh And Exciting

Freelancing has the potential to open new doors you may have only dreamed of in the 9 to 5 world. As you work on different projects and make new connections, you’ll start to gain glimpses into other industries on a regular basis, breaking up the monotony of doing the same job day in and day out.